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10 Best Dynamic Microphones for All Use-Cases

The right microphone can be the difference between an unforgettable performance and a forgettable one. Whether you’re a budding podcaster, a live performer, or a musician seeking that perfect sound, the dynamic microphone is a staple in the audio world.

But with a plethora of options available, how do you find the one that’s tailor-made for your needs? Dive into our curated list of the 10 best dynamic microphones for every situation to discover the gems of the industry, from budget-friendly wonders to high-end masterpieces.

What are the 10 Best Dynamic Microphones for Each Situation?

Here are our top 10 best dynamic microphones for every use case, listed in no particular order of superiority:

1. Aston Stealth – Most Versatile Dynamic Microphone (US$275.00)

Why would you want this dynamic microphone?

You want a microphone that can do it all: record voiceovers, vocals, instruments, and more.

Aston Stealth front
Aston Stealth back
Aston Stealth back

Overview

Aston Microphones, a British manufacturer established in 2015, may be relatively new to the audio industry, but they’ve quickly gained a reputation for producing uniquely designed microphones packed with innovative features. Their ambition with the Aston Stealth dynamic microphone was to craft the world’s most versatile microphone, and they’ve certainly made a compelling case.

At first glance, the Aston Stealth might be mistaken for a typical podcast dynamic mic, bearing a resemblance to the cylindrical designs of the SM7B and PreSonus PD-70. However, distinct differences set it apart. Instead of a yoke mount, it employs a quick-release stand mount, allowing for effortless insertion and removal. Additionally, it features a non-removable pop filter at its tip, contrasting with the sock-like windscreens of its counterparts.

The Aston Stealth has a substantial feel, weighing in at 1.5 lbs. Much of this weight is attributed to a counterweight used to mass-load the dynamic mic capsule, enhancing its sonic tone. The capsule is freely suspended in midair within the microphone chassis at 3 points by Sorbothane polymer hemispheres, serving as an internal shock mount and eliminating the need for an external one.

In terms of sound quality, the Aston Stealth dynamic mic is essentially four distinct microphones rolled into one, showcasing its versatility. A tamper-proof switch ring at the microphone’s base allows users to toggle between four unique voicings.

The V1 setting delivers a classic studio dynamic sound with a pronounced mid-frequency response, ideal for male vocals. The V2 setting mimics a studio condenser mic, offering a rich low-end and bright high-frequency response, typically preferred for female voices. The G setting, distinct from the others, is optimized for guitar amps, acoustic guitars, and bass guitars. Lastly, the D setting captures the velvety vintage warmth characteristic of ribbon microphones.

If the Aston Stealth dynamic mic hasn’t already piqued your interest, it boasts another remarkable feature. This active dynamic microphone comes equipped with a built-in Class A preamp. It automatically senses the presence of phantom power and provides an impressive 50dB of clean gain. To put this into perspective, even a $150 Cloudlifter offers just +25dB of gain.

In its active mode, a mere quarter-turn of your audio interface’s gain dial is sufficient to produce a clear signal. Furthermore, the Aston Stealth’s base emits a purple LED glow, indicating its active mode when phantom power is engaged.

A minor drawback is the microphone’s somewhat loose fit in its clip, raising concerns about potential mishaps. However, overlooking this minor issue, the Aston Stealth stands out as an exceptionally versatile tool for various audio scenarios.


Product Info

  • Polar Pattern: Cardioid polar pattern
  • Transducer Type: Dynamic (moving coil)
  • Power Requirements: Phantom power for active mode
  • Frequency Response: 20 Hz to 20,000 Hz
  • Sensitivity (Passive Mode): average -60 dBV/Pa (1 mV/Pa) @1kHz
  • Sensitivity (Active Mode): average -16.5 dBV/Pa (150 mV/Pa) @1kHz
  • Max SPL: 140dB
  • Self Noise: 10 dB (A-weighted)
  • Output Connection: XLR
  • Weight: 692 g (1.52 lbs)
  • Accessories: quick-release mic clip, Aston pin

Features

  • Four selectable unique voicings
  • Tamper-proof switch ring
  • Active and passive modes
  • Class A preamp with 50dB gain in active mode
  • 48V phantom power auto-detection with purple LED indicator
  • Internal Sorbothane shock mount
  • Quick-release mic clip

Pros

  • Four mics for the price of one, incredibly valued for money
  • Unique, high-quality sound signature for each voicing
  • No need for an external pop filter and shock mount as these are built-in
  • Extremely high sensitivity in active mode removes the need for a gain booster
  • The tone does not change in active mode

Cons

  • The mic clip feels wobbly at times


2. Electro-Voice RE20 – Best Dynamic Microphone for Podcasting (US$449.00)

Why would you want this dynamic microphone?

You want the best podcasting microphone with a deep broadcast tone and top-end clarity.

Electro-Voice RE20
Electro-Voice RE20 on mount

Overview

I know many hardcore fanboys will be saying, “That’s wrong! The best dynamic microphone for podcasting is the Shure SM7B!” Well, hold your horses. These two titans are so closely matched that when it comes to either of them, it boils down to personal preference. That’s why I also have a review for the Shure SM7B dynamic microphone under the ‘Honorable Mentions’ section.

The Electro-Voice RE20 dynamic mic is proudly made in the USA, and for such a sleek and modern-looking microphone, you might be surprised to learn it was first released in 1968. It has a rock-solid steel body, which makes it very durable and also resistant to external radio-frequency interference.

There are slits on the sides of its body with a firm mesh grill underneath that contribute to the microphone’s innovative Variable-D (variable distance) design, which helps to control the proximity effect to achieve a consistent off-axis response. The tone of your voice does not change regardless of which direction you are speaking from, and you do not get that muddy and boomy sound when you speak close to the mic.

Much like the Shure SM7B dynamic microphone, the Electro-Voice RE20 has an incredibly rich and warm broadcast tone with a very deep and authoritative low end. What makes it edgier than the SM7B is its brighter and crisper high-end, which makes the RE20 sound more exciting and gives it more presence, almost like a condenser mic. Also, it does not require as much gain as the Shure SM7B in order to sound audible.

While the Electro-Voice RE20 is renowned as a broadcast mic, it also excels when used as a guitar cab mic or vocal mic, thanks to its crisp high frequencies and ability to handle high SPLs (sound pressure level). Similar to condenser mics, it’s suitable for recording acoustic guitars, guitar amps, bass guitars, vocals, and even kick drums.

The Electro-Voice RE20 has a high-pass filter that, on paper, seems to roll off aggressively starting from 400Hz, but it sounds quite smooth in reality.

One downside to this amazing mic is that it has quite an audible low-frequency resonance when you accidentally bump into the microphone stand, so it’s better to get a shock mount to manage that.

Check out our detailed comparison between the Electro-Voice RE20 and the Shure SM7B!


Product Info

  • Polar Pattern: Cardioid pattern
  • Transducer Type: Dynamic (moving coil)
  • Power Requirements: None
  • Frequency Response: 45 Hz to 18,000 Hz
  • Sensitivity: -56.5 dBV/Pa (1.5 mV/Pa) @1kHz
  • Output Connection: XLR
  • Weight: 735g (1.62 lbs)
  • Accessories: Stand mount, carry case

Features

  • 400 Hz bass roll-off switch
  • Variable-D technology for controlling proximity effect
  • Humbucking coil guards against line hum

Pros

  • Made in USA
  • Sleek and modern-looking
  • Very robust and solid steel construction
  • Deep, warm, and rich broadcasting tone
  • Crisp high-ends like a condenser mic
  • Reduced muddiness at close proximity and consistent off-axis response
  • Resistant to electromagnetic hum and broadband interference

Cons

  • Has audible body resonance when bumped
  • Internal foam can degrade over time

Electro-Voice RE20

Electro-Voice RE20


3. Rode PodMic – Best Budget Microphone for Podcasting – (US$99.00)

Why would you want this dynamic microphone?

You want a high-quality but affordable dynamic microphone for podcasting.

Rode PodMic front
Rode PodMic upright
Rode PodMic back
Rode PodMic boom arm
Rode PodMic stand

Overview

The Rode PodMic was launched with significant anticipation in 2019, following the success of the Rode Procaster dynamic mic. It was envisioned as a budget podcast microphone that would offer near-professional broadcasting sound quality at a fraction of the cost.

Upon receiving the package, the first thing you’ll notice is its surprising weight. You might think you have received the wrong item, but I assure you that it is not.

The Rode PodMic is incredibly heavy, weighing 2.06 lbs (935g). For comparison, the Procaster weighs only 1.53 lbs (695g) despite being twice the length of the PodMic (and twice the price!). Given its weight, it is a good idea to get a sturdy boom arm like the Rode PSA-1.

With its all-metal construction, the Rode PodMic feels incredibly robust and built like a tank. It also comes equipped with a solid adjustable swing-arm mount for attachment to a boom arm, a feature absent in the Procaster.

The Rode PodMic delivers a clear and full-bodied sound straight out of the box. A slight boost in the lower-mid frequencies adds body to the sound. If you examine the frequency curve, you can see that Rode has pre-EQed the microphone, optimizing it for voiceovers or podcasts, minimizing the need for extensive post-processing.

However, it does have its limitations. The PodMic is somewhat lacking in the low frequencies, making it less ideal for recording vocals or instruments. It’s also susceptible to plosives, so a pop filter is recommended.

This dynamic microphone is straightforward, featuring just an XLR output. While it’s designed to pair seamlessly with the RODECaster Pro II audio mixer, it should work well with any quality audio interface with at least 55 dB of clean gain.


Product Info

  • Polar Pattern: Cardioid polar pattern
  • Transducer Type: Dynamic (moving coil)
  • Power Requirements: None
  • Frequency Response: 50 Hz to 20,000 Hz
  • Sensitivity: -57 dBV/Pa (1.6 mV/Pa) @1kHz
  • Output Connection: XLR
  • Weight: 935g (2.06 lbs)
  • Accessories: 3/8″ to 5/8″ thread adapter

Features

  • Adjustable swing-arm mount
  • Internal pop filter

Pros

  • Extremely solid and robust build quality
  • Affordable and good value for money
  • Compact size takes up minimal screen space
  • Clear and full-bodied sound that is ideal for voiceovers

Cons

  • Need a strong boom arm due to the mic’s weight
  • Susceptible to plosives
  • Slightly lacking in the low-end


4. PreSonus Revelator Dynamic USB – Best Dynamic Microphone for Streaming – (US$199.99)

Why would you want this dynamic microphone?

You want the best dynamic streaming microphone that sounds good and has great software features for streaming.

PreSonus Revelator Dynamic front
PreSonus Revelator Dynamic back
PreSonus Revelator Dynamic side
mic stand

Overview

PreSonus might not be the first name that springs to mind when considering high-quality microphones, but the PreSonus Revelator Dynamic USB Mic proves they can compete with the best. In terms of sound quality and software capabilities, it stands out as one of the best dynamic microphones for streaming.

At first glance, it’s clear which dynamic microphone the Revelator is emulating: the iconic Shure SM7B. From its cylindrical body to its elongated protective capsule cage, the resemblance is uncanny. However, PreSonus added a modern touch to it with a half-yoke mount.

The PreSonus Dynamic USB mic sounds surprisingly good. Straight out of the box, it offers a warm, natural sound, with a pronounced proximity effect that enriches the voice when spoken closely. Even the pricier Shure MV7 sounds somewhat thin in comparison.

This USB dynamic microphone boasts a variety of connections and controls. Notably, it employs a USB-C port, a welcome departure from the older USB-micro or USB-B ports found on USB dynamic mics like the Shure MV7 and Rode Podcaster. A preset button facilitates quick cycling between different voice profiles.

Additionally, it features a headphone output jack and a ‘Monitor’ button for zero-latency monitoring, complete with a volume control dial. While the headphone amps might struggle with high-impedance headphones, they handle models like the Sennheiser HD 280 Pro (64 ohms) adequately. A long press on the ‘Monitor’ button activates gain adjustment for the microphone.

The standout feature of the PreSonus Revelator Dynamic USB is its onboard DSP with the Universal Control app. This app is filled with features for tailoring the microphone’s sound and enhancing live streams.

With eight voice presets ranging from professional broadcasting tones to playful robot voices, there’s something for every streamer. If the presets don’t appeal, users can craft their own signal chain using various audio processors. These custom presets are stored directly on the microphone’s onboard DSP.

While integrated audio processing software is common in USB microphones like the Shure MV7 and Blue Yeti, virtual mixers are rarer. The Universal Control app’s virtual mixer allows users to blend different audio sources, creating distinct mixes for streaming audiences and chat teammates.


Product Info

  • Polar Pattern: Cardioid polar pattern
  • Transducer Type: Dynamic (moving coil)
  • Power Requirements: USB bus-powered
  • Frequency Response: 20 Hz to 20,000 Hz
  • Sensitivity: -57 dBV/Pa (1.6 mV/Pa) @1kHz
  • Max SPL: 135dB
  • Output Connection: USB-C
  • Headphone Output: 3.5mm (1/8″)
  • Weight: 0.42 kg (0.92 lbs)
  • Accessories: desktop tripod, windscreen, 2m USB-C to USB-A cable, thread adapters

Features

  • Onboard DSP with Universal Control software for audio processing and voice effects
  • Virtual mixer with two loopback channels
  • Software bundle featuring Studio One Artist DAW and Studio Magic
  • Preset selector button, monitor button, and dial for volume and gain control

Pros

  • Very good value for money
  • Clear, professional audio that sounds warm and natural
  • The Universal Control app is user-friendly and has many features for enhancing audio
  • The integrated virtual mixer is very useful for a gaming live streamer
  • Classy and modern design for a podcast mic

Cons

  • Headphone amps are not powerful enough for high-impedance headphones

reSonus Revelator Dynamic front

PreSonus Revelator Dynamic USB


5. Shure KSM8 Dualdyne – Best Dynamic Microphone for Live Vocals – (US$399.00)

Why would you want this dynamic microphone?

You want the best live vocal mic that allows you to move freely on stage without worrying about mic position.

Shure KSM8 - front
Shure KSM8 - capsule
Shure KSM8 - dual diaphragm capsule
Shure KSM8 - accessories

Overview

When you already have a renowned microphone like the Shure SM58, it might seem unnecessary to reinvent the wheel—unless, of course, you’re Shure (pun intended). Enter the Shure KSM8 Dualdyne, arguably one of the best dynamic microphones for live vocals out there.

In a time when many microphone manufacturers lean on electronics and software audio processing to enhance sound quality, the KSM8 is an amazing vocal microphone that stands out with its mechanical Dualdyne design, a feat that took Shure sound engineers seven years to develop.

The groundbreaking Dualdyne technology incorporates dual diaphragms within a single capsule (as opposed to dual-capsules, which are typical for condenser mics). This design reverses airflow of sound waves and effectively controls the proximity effect. As a result, it eliminates the muddled bass that can occur when a vocalist is too close to the microphone while still allowing for volume amplification.

Thanks to this controlled proximity effect, the KSM8 vocal microphone boasts a remarkably consistent frequency response and an expansive sweet spot. This makes it an incredible vocal mic that ensures the voice remains sharp and lucid, irrespective of the vocalist’s distance or angle from the mic.

Additionally, its diaphragm stabilization system and internal shock mount offer enhanced resistance to handling noise. These features empower performers to move freely on stage—and even toss the mic into the air (though we’d advise against it)—all while maintaining consistent sound quality.

Compared to the Shure SM58 dynamic mic, the KSM8 offers a flatter frequency response, a more authentic sound and also requires less gain. It delivers smooth highs, clear mids, and a well-defined bass.

Beyond vocals, the KSM8’s versatility shines. It’s adept at recording loud instruments with rapid transient responses, such as drums and electric guitars. This adaptability cements its position as one of the best dynamic microphones for live performances.


Product Info

  • Microphone Type: Dual-diaphragm dynamic
  • Polar Pattern: Cardioid
  • Frequency Response: 40 Hz to 16,000 Hz
  • Sensitivity: -51.5 dBV/Pa (2.66 mV/Pa) @1kHz
  • Output Connection: XLR
  • Weight: 330g (0.72 lbs)
  • Accessories: Zippered hard carrying case, microphone mount, 5/8” to 3/8” thread adapter

Features

  • Patented Dualdyne cartridge for minimizing proximity effect
  • Internal pumping pneumatic shock-mounted capsule
  • Diaphragm stabilization system for protecting the diaphragm against plosives and impact
  • Integrated hydrophobic wind protection

Pros

  • One of the best dynamic mics for live vocals
  • Highly controlled and reduced proximity effect
  • Consistent off-axis response
  • Clear and smooth sound in the low and high frequencies
  • Highly durable and robust
  • Very little handling noise

Cons

  • Quite costly for a dynamic microphone

Shure KSM8 - front

Shure KSM8 Dualdyne


6. Shure SM58 – Best Budget Microphone for Live Vocals – (US$99.00)

Why would you want this dynamic microphone?

You want an affordable and reliable live vocal microphone that is trusted by millions.

Shure SM58 upright
Shure SM58 back
Shure SM58 front
Shure SM58 on stand mount
Shure SM58 accessories

Overview

Without a doubt, the Shure SM58 dynamic microphone is the most recognizable microphone in the world and is a favorite among professional and budding artists due to its affordability and durability. You’ve probably even used emojis of it without realizing it.

The Shure SM58 is a very robust and durable vocal mic. It can probably withstand the rigors of a world tour with drops, knocks, and the occasional splash and still function perfectly. There are artists who have a working SM58 dynamic mic even after decades of use!

The iconic ball-shaped grille and built-in pop filter are effective for reducing plosives, while its internal pneumatic shock mount reduces handling noise and vibrations coming from the stage. These features, coupled with its cardioid pickup pattern and its good background rejection capability, make it an ideal vocal mic for live performances.

The Shure SM58 dynamic microphone has a colored response – a brightened midrange with a bass roll-off around 100Hz that allows vocals to cut through a mix. It has a characteristic sound signature tailored for vocalists across various genres due to its presence boost around 2kHz to 8kHz.

While the SM58 is primarily known for its live sound capabilities, it’s not uncommon to find it in recording studios, especially for artists who prefer a live feel to their recordings.

Its versatility, combined with its affordability, makes it an excellent choice for those looking to get a high-quality cardioid dynamic microphone without breaking the bank.


Product Info

  • Polar Pattern: Cardioid pattern
  • Transducer Type: Dynamic (moving coil)
  • Power Requirements: None
  • Frequency Response: 50 Hz to 15,000 Hz
  • Sensitivity: -54.5 dBV/Pa (1.88 mV/Pa) @1kHz
  • Output Connection: XLR
  • Weight: 0.3 kg (0.66 lbs)
  • Accessories: Zipper pouch, mic clip

Features

  • Internal pneumatic shock mount system
  • Built-in pop filter

Pros

  • Very affordable
  • Robust and highly durable
  • Can withstand very high SPLs
  • Frequency response helps vocals cut through a mix
  • Reduced handling noise and vibration

Cons

  • Requires a fair amount of gain
  • The top end might sound harsh, and not much details in the bass
  • Not the best for recording instruments due to its lack of details


7. Beyerdynamic M 160 – Best Dynamic Microphone for Instruments (US$799.00)

Why would you want this dynamic microphone?

You want the best instrument mic that has a dark, warm, and realistic tone.

Beyerdynamic M160 front
Beyerdynamic M160 on mic mount
Beyerdynamic M160 close up

Overview

I know what you’re thinking: “Why should I pay eight times more for a microphone that looks just like a Shure SM58?” But looks can be deceiving. Record your electric guitar with the Beyerdynamic M160, and you’ll quickly understand its value.

The Beyerdynamic M160 is a product of precise German engineering. Though lesser-known, it actually predates the Shure SM58, debuting in 1957, compared to the SM58’s 1966 introduction.

This microphone isn’t your typical dynamic moving-coil mic. It belongs to a sub-category of dynamic microphones known as ribbon mics. While the Beyerdynamic M160 might resemble the Shure SM58, their similarities end with their appearance.

The Beyerdynamic M160 features a hyper-cardioid polar pattern, making it highly directional and adept at rejecting unwanted background noise. This characteristic is unusual since most ribbon mics typically exhibit a bidirectional pickup pattern.

In terms of tone, the Beyerdynamic M160 offers a rich, warm low end and a soft, smooth high end. Unlike many ribbon microphones that sometimes lack detail in higher frequencies, the M160 excels.

The Beyerdynamic M160 is certainly one of the best dynamic microphones for recording instruments. It can capture the crunch of electric guitar distortion with high fidelity as if you’re hearing it live, and it can also reproduce the shimmer of a strummed acoustic guitar and the sharp transients of snares or kick drums.

While the Beyerdynamic M160 is primarily marketed as an instrument microphone, there’s nothing stopping you from using it for vocals. It can capture voices with a sultry quality, making it ideal for genres like jazz, R&B, and soul.

However, one drawback of this microphone is its low sensitivity. It requires a significant amount of clean gain, necessitating a high-quality preamp or a microphone boost, such as a Cloudlifter or Fethead, to enhance its gain.


Product Info

  • Polar pattern: Hypercardioid
  • Circuit Type: Passive double ribbon
  • Power requirements: N/A
  • Frequency Response: 40 Hz to 18,000 Hz
  • Sensitivity: -60 dBV/Pa (1 mV/Pa) @1kHz
  • Output Connection: XLR, 3-pin, male
  • Weight: 156g
  • Accessories: Mic clamp with 5/8 to 3/8 inch adapter, storage pouch

Pros

  • Warm, and vintage ribbon sound, authoritative low ends
  • Smooth at high ends and able to capture details clearly
  • Good treble extension and smooth frequency response
  • Strong proximity effect
  • Sturdy and well-built
  • Made in Germany
  • Not as expensive as other ribbon mics but sound better
  • Very lightweight

Cons

  • Looks like a cheap karaoke mic (when it’s not)
  • Requires a lot of gain from a good preamp

Beyerdynamic M160 front

Beyerdynamic M 160


8. Shure SM57 – Best Budget Microphone for Instruments (US$99.00)

Why would you want this dynamic microphone?

You want a workhorse instrument mic that can withstand the test of time.

Shure SM57 upright
Shure SM57 front
Shure SM57 back
Shure SM57 accessories

Overview

The Shure SM57 dynamic mic is arguably one of the most prevalent microphones for recording musical instruments. Alongside the SM58, it has been a staple in the audio industry for live performances for decades.

Much like the Shure SM58, the SM57 is known for its affordability and its reputation as a durable workhorse that can outlive its owner.

Constructed robustly, it features a metal handle with its capsule encased in sturdy plastic. Many musicians have been known to casually toss it around and subject it to rough treatment during tours. Yet, despite such mishandling, it continues to perform flawlessly even after decades. Moreover, it’s adept at capturing loud instruments, such as guitar cabinets and drum kits.

While the Shure SM57 and SM58 both utilize the same Unidyne III mic element and have similar frequency response curves, their sound signatures are distinct. The SM57 is an instrument mic that offers a brighter sound than the SM58, particularly in the higher frequencies, and presents a clear and flat frequency response in the midrange. It also features the same pumping pneumatic shock mount as the SM58 for reducing handling noise.

However, its bass begins to roll off around 200 Hz, which can result in instruments recorded with the SM57 lacking depth in the lower frequencies. To address this, some musicians pair the SM57 with a ribbon microphone, such as the Beyerdynamic M160, achieving a rich, warm bass complemented by a crisp and bright top end.


Product Info

  • Polar Pattern: Cardioid polar pattern
  • Transducer Type: Dynamic (moving coil)
  • Power Requirements: None
  • Frequency Response: 40 Hz to 15,000 Hz
  • Sensitivity: -54.5 dBV/Pa (1.88 mV/Pa) @1kHz
  • Output Connection: XLR
  • Weight: 285g (0.63 lbs)
  • Accessories: Zipper pouch, mic clip

Pros

  • Very affordable
  • Robust and highly durable
  • Can withstand very high SPL
  • Popular mic for guitar amps, guitar cabs, and drum kits
  • Reduced handling noise and vibration

Cons

  • Requires a fair amount of gain
  • The top end might sound harsh
  • Lacks clarity in the bass


9. BEACN Mic – Microphone with the Best Software (US$279.00)

Why would you want this dynamic microphone?

You want a microphone that has the most robust software for audio processing and streaming.

PreSonus Revelator Dynamic front
PreSonus Revelator Dynamic back
PreSonus Revelator Dynamic side
PreSonus Revelator Dynamic stand

Overview

When considering the BEACN Mic, it feels as though you’re purchasing top-tier microphone audio processing software and receiving an average microphone as a bonus. Nonetheless, for streamers, this USB dynamic mic remains a compelling option.

The BEACN Mic’s design closely emulates one of the most iconic dynamic mics, the Shure SM7B. As the adage goes, “If you can’t beat them, join them.” However, it does offer a refreshing alternative with a white body and a striking RGB ring light around the microphone’s midsection. The only controls present are a USB-C port and a 3.5mm headphone output jack.

Without any audio processing, the BEACN Mic’s sound is somewhat thin and crunchy, reminiscent of the Shure MV7. It lacks the deep, smooth broadcasting tone characteristic of dynamic mics like the Shure SM7B or Electro-Voice RE20. Fortunately, the BEACN app can somewhat enhance this.

A notable feature of the BEACN Mic is its 32-bit floating point output. This allows recording from the softest whisper to the loudest scream. Later, in post-production, these recordings can be normalized to ensure no distortion or clipping, even if the initial gain setting was off.

Another impressive feature of the BEACN Mic is its robust headphone preamps, capable of powering everything from consumer earphones to high-impedance studio monitoring headphones. Additionally, it includes a 2m headphone extension cable, which helps in keeping headphone cables from obstructing the microphone.

The standout feature is undoubtedly the BEACN software, which has a ton of impressive tools like the patent-pending real-time Noise Suppression and Enhancement Suite. Its robustness and comprehensiveness eclipse other microphone plugins or software available. The software even serves as an educational guide on various audio processing aspects.

The BEACN app’s audio processing tools strike a balance between professionalism and user-friendliness, offering intricate customization levels. For instance, in EQ settings, frequency bands are categorized into sub-bass, bass, broadcast, nasal, mid-highs & esses, and highs and air. This categorization provides a clear visualization of the EQ curve modifications. Plus, users receive real-time feedback during recording, showcasing how the EQ curve and compressor impact the recording.

To top it off, the BEACN app features a “Routing Table” or virtual mixer, similar to the Elgato Wave:3 and the PreSonus Revelator Dynamic USB. This allows for mixing multiple audio sources and routing them to distinct channels, catering to both the user and their audience.


Product Info

  • Polar Pattern: Cardioid polar pattern
  • Transducer Type: Dynamic (moving coil)
  • Power Requirements: USB bus-powered
  • Frequency Response: 20 Hz to 20,000 Hz
  • Sensitivity: -27dBFS @ minimum gain
  • Output Connection: USB-C
  • Weight: 751g (1.66 lbs)
  • Accessories: 3.5m USB-C to USB-C cable, 2m 3.5mm extension cable, USB-C to USB-A adapter

Features

  • Built-in DSP processor with integrated BEACN app
  • Real-time Noise Suppression
  • Bass Enhancement and Exciter
  • Gate/Expander/Compression/EQ audio processors
  • Routing Table virtual mixer
  • Customizable RGB Ring Light
  • 32-bit float sample rate

Pros

  • Most comprehensive and robust microphone audio software for streamers
  • Powerful headphone amplifier that can power high-impedance headphones
  • Sleek SM7B-like design and looks like a proper gaming mic

Cons

  • Average sound quality out of the box


10. Behringer XM8500 – Best Budget Dynamic Microphone (US$29.99)

Why would you want this dynamic microphone?

You’re on a tight budget and want a decent mic at the most affordable price.

Behringer XM8500 front
Behringer XM8500 back
Behringer XM8500 accessories

Overview

When it comes to affordability, the Behringer XM8500 reigns supreme as the King of Budget Dynamic Mics. Priced at roughly the cost of an average dinner for two, this microphone offers surprisingly commendable quality, making it an ideal choice for budding musicians or those on a tight budget.

Despite its modest price tag, the XM8500 boasts a durable all-metal body complemented by a sturdy mesh grill. Its rugged matte finish not only enhances its aesthetic appeal but also ensures a secure grip. Impressively, it comes with a hard carrying case—an accessory often absent even in some pricier microphones.

While the XM8500 might not dazzle like some high-end microphones, it consistently delivers a dependable performance. It’s versatile enough for close-miking drums, capturing the raw tones of metal vocals, or recording the delicate strums of an acoustic guitar.

However, it’s worth noting that the XM8500’s sound profile leans towards the muddy side at the low end, lacks smoothness in the higher frequencies, and doesn’t offer the midrange detail found in more premium dynamic mics. But with adept EQing, one can elevate its sound quality to rival that of more expensive counterparts. In fact, tweaking the XM8500 can serve as an excellent exercise in mastering EQ techniques, enabling users to extract a crisp and smoother sound from this modest mic.

Additionally, the XM8500 is equipped with features like a two-stage pop filter, which effectively minimizes breath and pop noises, and an internal shock mount system. However, it’s worth mentioning that, despite the shock mount, the microphone does tend to pick up a noticeable amount of handling noise.


Product Info

  • Polar Pattern: Cardioid polar pattern
  • Transducer Type: Dynamic (moving coil)
  • Power Requirements: None
  • Frequency Response: 50 Hz to 15,000 Hz
  • Sensitivity: -70 dBV/Pa (0.32 mV/Pa) @1kHz
  • Output Connection: XLR
  • Weight: 240g (0.53 lbs)
  • Accessories: Hard carrying case, mic clip

Pros

  • Extremely affordable
  • Robust and highly durable
  • Can withstand very high SPL
  • Good enough audio that can be EQed

Cons

  • Requires a fair amount of gain
  • Muddy low end and not smooth at higher frequencies
  • Quite a bit of handling noise

Behringer XM8500 front

Behringer XM8500


Honorable Mentions

11. Shure SM7B – Most Popular Podcasting Microphone (US$399.00)

Why would you want this dynamic microphone?

You want the most trusted and recognizable podcasting microphone.

Shure SM7B side
Shure SM7B side
Shure SM7B upright
Shure SM7B protective cage
Shure SM7B filter switches
Shure SM7B on mic stand
Shure SM7B on boom arm
Shure SM7B accessories

Overview

It is impossible for me to write an on ‘The Best Dynamic Microphones’ without including the legendary Shure SM7B. That would be like excluding Muhammad Ali from a list of the greatest boxers of all time.

The Shure SM7B is arguably the most recognized podcasting microphone globally, frequently featured in countless YouTube videos. Its sleek, signature black cylindrical design, topped with a foam windscreen, gives a professional touch to any podcast or streaming setup, imbuing users with a sense of gravitas as they speak into it.

The allure of the Shure SM7B stems from its exceptional audio quality, especially when paired with a high-quality audio interface or preamp and given some audio processing. Users are rewarded with a rich and clear, resonant tone that exudes authority.

This SM7B dynamic microphone has a wide frequency response, but its high-ends are subtly subdued, particularly in the air frequencies, which seem to accentuate the bass and mids, resulting in a warm, full-bodied sound. Its pronounced proximity effect, when used correctly by moving closer to the mic, allows podcasters to achieve the deep, broadcast-quality voice the SM7B is renowned for.

The microphone capsule of the Shure SM7B is nestled within its extended protective cage. Coupled with its windscreen, this design effectively mitigates plosives. The mic excels at isolating vocals and minimizing background noise. Whether you’re in a moderately noisy cafe or an acoustically untreated room, the SM7B reliably captures crisp vocals with minimal background interference.

There are also some filter switches on the rear of the Shure SM7B dynamic microphone for bass roll-off and a midrange boost.

However, for all its sonic prowess and glowing reviews, the Shure SM7B isn’t the most beginner-friendly option. This gain-hungry microphone demands high-grade preamps and sufficient audio processing to sound its best.


Product Info

  • Polar Pattern: Cardioid pattern
  • Transducer Type: Dynamic (moving coil)
  • Power Requirements: None
  • Frequency Response: 50 Hz to 20,000 Hz
  • Sensitivity: -59 dBV/Pa (1.12 mV/Pa) @1kHz
  • Output Connection: XLR
  • Weight: 850g (1.877 lbs)
  • Accessories: Foam windscreen, close-talk windscreen, and locking yoke mount

Features

  • Bass roll-off and mid-range boost filter switches with graphic display
  • Internal air suspension shock isolation
  • Yoke mounting with captive stand nut for easy mounting

Pros

  • The most recognizable podcasting microphone
  • Rugged and durable construction that can last a lifetime
  • Clear, authoritative, and deep tone
  • Very good at rejecting background noise and plosives
  • Strong proximity effect that gives a broadcasting voice
  • Resistant to electromagnetic hum and broadband interference

Cons

  • Requires a lot of gain
  • Costly


Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

The core difference lies in their design and functionality. Dynamic microphones use a diaphragm/voice coil/magnet assembly, making them robust and ideal for high sound pressure levels.

In contrast, condenser microphones utilize a diaphragm placed near a backplate, offering higher frequency and faster transient response.

Here is a more in-depth article about the differences between condenser mics and dynamic microphones.

Dynamic microphones are known for their durability, ability to handle high sound pressure levels without distortion, and generally do not require external power. They’re ideal for live sound environments and recording loud sound sources.

However, we have a great article if you want to learn more about other types of microphones.

While condenser microphones are often preferred in studio settings due to their sensitivity and wide frequency response, dynamic microphones can be excellent for recording specific instruments like drums, guitar amplifiers, and vocals, especially in genres like rock and metal.

No, dynamic microphones generate their own electrical current and typically do not require external power. However, some active dynamic microphones may benefit from phantom power.

Yes, dynamic microphones can be good for vocals, especially in certain contexts:

  1. Live Performances: Dynamic microphones are often preferred for live vocals due to their durability and ability to reject feedback and background noise.
  2. Loud Environments: They can handle high sound pressure levels without distortion, making them suitable for loud vocal performances, such as rock or metal singing.
  3. Warm Sound: Some dynamic microphones, like the Shure SM7B, are known for producing a warm and smooth vocal tone, which can be desirable for certain genres or vocal styles.
  4. Durability: Dynamic mics are robust and can withstand rough handling, making them ideal for touring and stage performances.

However, for studio recording, where detail and sensitivity are paramount, condenser microphones are often preferred for vocals due to their wider frequency response and ability to capture subtle nuances. But the choice ultimately depends on the desired sound and specific application.

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